They did what?

So how does one wrap one’s head around hiking through Southeast Asia for a year? Well, recently I’ve been reading up on lots of people who have done absolutely remarkable things in their lives. People that make what we’re about to do look so small by comparison. Doing this gives me reassurance that if these people can accomplish what they did, then we’ll be OK. At least that’s what I’m telling myself.

Satish Kumar
The original inspiration behind our walk. In the 1960s Kumar walked over 13,000km from India, through the four nuclear capitals of the world, to promote nuclear disarmament.

But wait, there’s more.

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He did this without any money. Not a cent. He relied on the kindness of strangers to keep him fed and sheltered.

But wait, there’s more.

Kumar is now 80 years old and to celebrate he walked 50 miles from the source of the Thames to Oxford. I don’t know many 80 year olds that could pull that off. I love my Nana but she certainly couldn’t.

Rosie Swale-Pope
A friend leant me the book about Swale-Pope’s attempt to run around the world. I was staying with this friend at the time and was constantly spouting expletives in disbelief. This woman is tough.

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20,000 miles, Siberian winter, Alaskan winter, wolves, frostbite and all sorts of other things. At one point on her journey she got hit by a bus. This was actually a stroke of luck because she had pneumonia at the time. The bus driver took her to a hospital and probably saved her life.

Yep. I know.

She undertook this massive adventure to raise awareness of cancer after her partner died.

Sarah Marquis
Another solo explorer, Marquis walked from Siberia to Australia. As you do. She braved floods and storms in Siberia. Locals in a village in China lit a forest on fire to get her to move along. She caught Dengue fever in the middle of the jungle in Laos. And that’s not even the half of it. What a legend!

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We had the chance to meet her when she came to Melbourne to promote her book. We totally got all start struck and for some reason I talked about my fear of being eaten alive by large mammals. Good one Megan.

Jane Goodall
This woman. A pioneer. I’ve actually named my backpack after her (in the hopes that I will respect it and not hate it). She had a dream and she made it happen. From a young age Goodall wanted to visit Africa and study the wildlife there. After a series of fortunate events and a ton of hard work, she eventually went on to live in Gombe National Park in Tanzania and studied the behaviour of chimpanzees. She was not a qualified scientist.

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Goodall developed trust with the chimpanzees. She developed trust with wild animals. Wild animals that could completely destroy you in a second. Large mammals are terrifying! Goodall made all kinds of unique and incredible discoveries.

And now she travels the world to promote conservation and action against climate change. The woman is over 80. She’s everything.
So you see, walking across Southeast Asia for a year is really no big deal. Right? Compared to what these amazing human beings did it’s a piece of cake. I highly recommend you read all of their books. Yes, they have all written books as well. Ugh. High achievers.

Who inspires you? Please share so that we may revel in the inspiration together.


2 thoughts on “They did what?

  1. Have you heard of Diane Fossey? She’s like the Jane Goodall of the gorillas… there is a movie and book about here: Gorillas in the Mist, but her biography Woman in the Mist is a must read!

    I love what your mission is: walk-sew-good. We need more of that in the world… I’m volunteering in the Philippines in coastal resource management and there is so much that could be done and needs to be done, soon! Good luck!

    Like

    1. I have heard of Diane Fossey but I’ve never read her bio. Sounds like it would be an incredible read. Thanks for the suggestion!

      And thank you for the good vibes. The work you’re doing in the Philippines sounds so interesting. Tell us more!

      Liked by 1 person

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